People have different opinions about different things, which has created a wonderfully diverse world with so many ways to do things. However, there are some topics wherein factual information is crucial. Some good examples are cleanliness and sanitation. When it comes to these topics, only the truth matters, especially in the middle of the pandemic, when keeping public and personal places clean is your best defense against infection. 

This article will tell you common misconceptions about cleaning and the facts you should know about them. 

Misconception 1: Bleach Is the Only Solution You Need

Bleach is indeed a great surface cleaner, but you cannot rely on it for everything. Bleach can successfully kill germs in any area or item, but it cannot remove the soil and dirt on most surfaces. The best cleaning method is to wipe out surfaces first using soap and warm water to remove the dirt and debris before disinfecting it with household bleach. 

More importantly, keep in mind that bleach has strong properties that can even remove colors on some surfaces. Make sure to take precautions when using it and educate yourself on the dos and don’ts when using the product. 

If you have any pets, do not clean up their urine with bleach. When combined with the chemicals in urine, the interaction may produce fumes that irritate both you and your pets. 

Misconception 2: All Disinfectants Work the Same

Disinfectants come in many forms. They kill bacteria, viruses, mildews, and fungi on a specific period while being regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Alcohol, chlorine, and hydrogen peroxide are examples of disinfectants, but they each have their specialty and uses. 

  • Alcohol is used to disinfect hands, small surfaces, and some equipment’s external surfaces. It can also be used as a household cleaner. However, this disinfectant is flammable, so you can only use it in well-ventilated areas.
  • Chlorine has been used in many applications. It is used in deactivating pathogens in drinking water, wastewater, and swimming pools. It is also used to disinfect areas in the house or for bleaching textiles. 
  • Hydrogen peroxide is used to disinfect surfaces, such as walls, glass, doorknobs, toilets, and other similar surfaces. It is also used to reduce bacterial contamination in hospital items such as textiles and urinary drainage bags. 

 

Misconception 3: There Is Only One Method for Using Disinfectants

Disinfectants work in different ways. For some, you may need to keep it on a surface for a particular time, while others require immediate wiping. If you fail to follow as instructed, your disinfectant may not work as it should or cause damage to the surface you’re trying to clean. 

When cleaning a particular surface, you should learn about these three things for effective cleaning:

  • The type of surface you are cleaning
  • The best disinfectant to use on said surfaces
  • The proper usage of the disinfectant you choose

 

Misconception 4: Hiring a Professional Cleaner Is an Unnecessary Expense

A professional cleaning company can do the job of keeping your building clean and sanitized, but you are paying for more than the process of cleaning. You are also paying for peace of mind and professional knowledge. Such professionals have the expertise and experience to ensure that the right products are used in your place, ensuring the process is safe for all inhabitants and belongings. 

 

Conclusion

Keeping a public space clean can be challenging, but it is the responsibility of anyone who manages one. If any of these misconceptions sound true to you, it is time to relearn the facts and make adjustments for everyone’s safety. After all, safety should be your top priority. Any misconceptions could put that at risk. 

Should you need the help of professional cleaning businesses in Medicine Hat, contact us at Cleanrite Services. We provide flexible and affordable cleaning services for commercial and office spaces. Request your quote today.

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